Team

Research team




Denis Brousseau PhD, Research associate


Université Laval, Pavillon d'optique-photonique, office 3145
Telephone: 418-656-2131 ext. 4646
denis.brousseau@copl.ulaval.ca

Expertise: Lens design, metrology, astronomical instrumentation, adaptive optics

Denis Brousseau completed his PhD in physics from Université Laval (Québec) in 2008, under the supervision of Prof. Ermanno F. Borra. The same year, he joined the NSERC Industrial research chair in optical design as a research associate. His work focus on scientific and industrial lens design challenges. In the field of astronomical instrumentation, he took part in the conception, assembly and testing of optical components for SITELLE and SPIRou, two instruments for the Canada-France-Hawaii telescope. He developped an optical simulation setup for NIRISS (JWST) and participate to the optical design of PESTO for Observatoire du Mont-Mégantic. He is currently working on NIRPS (Near Infra-Red Planet Searcher), an infrared spectrometer to be installer at the ESO 3,6m telescope in Chile.





Anne-Sophie Poulin-Girard PhD, Research associate


Université Laval, Pavillon d'optique-photonique, office 3145
Telephone: 418-656-2131 ext. 4646
anne-sophie.poulin-girard@copl.ulaval.ca

Expertise: Optical engineering, computer vision, metrology, optical testing

Anne-Sophie Poulin-Girard received her PhD from Université Laval in 2016, under the supervision of Profs. Simon Thibault and Denis Laurendeau. Her thesis focused on the use of panoramic lenses in 3D reconstruction, at the boundary between optical engineering and computer vision. Following her PhD, she became the scientific coordinator of the Canada Excellence Research Chair in Neurophotonics. In 2017, she came back to Prof. Thibault's team as a research associate. She is also responsible of the scientific and technical coordination of the NSERC Industrial chair in optical design. She currently participate in research projects in 3D computer vision and wide-angle lenses. Passionnate about education, she has been a lecturer from 2011 to 2015 and created various programs and resources like FEMTO, the canadian webportal for the International year of Light 2015 and the Photonics Games. Highly involved in her community, she is the current chair of SPIE Education committee and will welcome the international conference Education and Training in optics and photonics in 2019 as the general chair.





Hugues Auger, Senior technician


Université Laval, Pavillon d'optique-photonique, office 00302C
Telephone: 418-656-2131 ext. 2508
hugues.auger@copl.ulaval.ca

Expertise: Fabrication, optical test, assembly and characterisation, thin films, microfabrication

Hugues Auger obtained a technical college degree in physics engineering from Cégep de La Pocatière in 1988. He then joined INO as a technician where he participates in all the step of product fabrication, from planification to final inspection. He also trains other employees and is responsible for various equipments and faclities. He is experienced with a variety of specialized equipment and different measurement tools. In 2009, he joined the NSERC Industrial research chair in optical design at Université Laval. His advanced expertise in diffraction optics, lithography, microengraving, microfabrication and characterisation is put to good use. He is also the technician responsible for optical assembly and characterisation lab, and for the optical component fabrication lab.





Yasmine Alikacem, Master's student


Université Laval, Pavillon Alexandre-Vachon, office 2064
Telephone: 418-656-2131
yasmine.alikacem.1@ulaval.ca

Design, construction, calibration and experimental validation of a miniature detector to measure in-ice nutrients concentrations


Blooms of microalgae in the ocean require abundance of both light and nutrients. After the polar night, ice algae start growing as soon as enough light reaches the bottom of sea ice. Because of climate change, the Arctic icescape is getting thinner and dominated by first year ice, which results in earlier ice algal blooms. An early bloom, however, does not necessarily imply an increase in annual ice algae net primary production in the Arctic. The intricate balance between nutrients, specifically nitrate in the Arctic ocean, and light availability have been shown to control annual primary production. The amount of available nutrients for ice algae depends on the flux nutrients from the upper ocean to sea ice, and transport within sea ice. Both processes are difficult to quantify because they take place at small space and time scales. Traditional sea-ice sampling methods hardly allow capturing such variations. To better understand how the flux of nutrients from the upper ocean to sea ice and their transport within sea ice are controlled by the physical properties of the two media is especially important in a context where the Arctic icescape is profoundly changing together with sea-ice biology.

This research project aims at developing an optical sensor to measure in situ sea-ice nitrate concentration at small scale. This sensor will be integrated onto a Sea Ice Endoscopic (SIE) platform, a non-destructive multimodal probe which will be used to characterize sea ice radiative transfer and brine biophysical systems.





Guillaume Allain, Master's student


Université Laval, Pavillon d'optique-photonique, office 3134
Telephone: 418-656-2131 ext. 4584
guillaume.allain.1@ulaval.ca

HiCIBaS: Development of a spatial modulation low order wavefront sensor and its integration in astronomical imaging systems


The research project is part of the HiCIBaS project which has for objective to send a high contrast imaging system on a 35 km high flight onboard a stratospheric balloon. The main objective is to measure the atmospheric turbulence and the vibrations of such systems for direct exoplanet imaging. This project is centered around the development and the integrations of a new type of wavefront sensor that solves the challenges of small, space-like imaging systems. The available light for the wavefront reconstruction is limited by the size of the telescope that can be brought on the balloon and the amplitude of the detected aberration is very important due to the vibrations present in such systems.

The proposed solution is the use of an unmodulated pyramid wavefront sensor, which adequately responds to the low-light requirements and uses an axicon, a conical optical element, as a way to induce a very large offset aberration to the system. This simple modification opens a way to add a spatial modulation that increase the linearity of the wavefront sensors and allows to detect high amplitude wavefront error. This new type of wavefront sensor without any moving part is an ideal solution for wavefront analysis and control in space-like imaging systems.





Jeck Borne, Master's student


Université Laval, Pavillon d'optique-photonique, office 2177
Telephone: 418-656-2131 ext. 16566
jeck.borne.1@ulaval.ca

Theoretical and computational investigation of the Richards-Wolf formalism and the proposed extension for highly nonparaxial focusing


In optics, the Abbe criteria is commonly used to describe the resolution limit of an optical system. It predicts a resolution limit proportional to the fraction of the wavelength over the numerical aperture of the system (δ=λ/2Na). Knowing the working wavelength usually cannot be modified appreciably, optical performances can be enhanced by augmenting the numerical aperture. However, doing so, the scalar theory used no longer fully described the focusing phenomenon of the system; we need to change for a vectorial theory. The Richards-Wolf formalism (RWT) is typically used because of its simplicity, even though it describes an idealized system. To get rid of this issue, a colleague in the research group has proposed an extension (ERWT) to be closer of the reality: a non perfect spherical focusing wavefront. Because the proposed model hasn’t been confront to the solutions of Maxwell’s equations, my master thesis concerns to further the initiated theoretical study, to develop numerical tools to analyze the extension and to adjudicate on its validity. Advancements during my master will be the foundation of my doctorate project : the conception of a superresolution microscope using non paraxial formalism to optimize the interference patron at the focus of the system.





Tristan Chabot, Master's student


Université Laval, Pavillon d'optique-photonique, office 2177
Telephone: 418-656-2131 ext. 16566
tristan.chabot.1@ulaval.ca

Optical design of image slicers applied to spectroscopy


Modern telescopes possess the ability to image multiple stellar objects simultaneously, inside fairly large field of views, requiring large angular resolutions. The spectrographs that are used with those astronomical instruments, however, are limited in resolution by the width of their entry slit, as well as the incident beam’s diameter. To solve this problem, one may reduce the width of the slit by dividing the stellar image at the focal plane of the telescope or dividing the image of the telescope’s entrance pupil to reduce the beam’s effective diameter. These manipulations are made possible by the use of image slicers and pupil slicers, respectively. Such optical systems are traditionally composed of stacks of mirrors placed strategically to decompose the planes of interest in a series of thin slices, arranged in a given number of lines.

This Masters project is comprised in the development of a new infrared spectrograph for the Gemini-South Observatory, called the Gemini Infrared Multi-Object Spectrograph (GIRMOS). GIRMOS is designed to produce high angular-resolution and highly sensitive infrared images of the sky. My role in this project consists of designing an image slicer for this spectrograph, that will divide the telescope’s image plane into a series of thirty sub-images arranged in a single line. The designed optical system must also perform well in all the J, H and K bands of the infrared spectrum. My Masters project also comprises the design of a pupil slicer to be placed before a spectrograph named VROOMM, that will be installed at Mont Mégantic Observatory. It will be used to divide the pupil plane of an optical fiber in two superimposed segments and will operate in the visible light spectrum. Furthermore, my project includes the diamond turning fabrication of mirrors used in the University of Florida’s MIRADAS instrument’s Macro-Slicer, as well as the quality control of their surface.





Geoffroi Côté, Master's student


Université Laval, Pavillon d'optique-photonique, office 3134
Telephone: 418-656-2131 ext. 4584
geoffroi.cote.1@ulaval.ca

Assisting lens design with artificial intelligence


A large number of variables are usually necessary to represent optical designs. Those variables must be optimized to meet the requirements of a given problem. The design process is usually a trial and error process requiring the lens designer to find a decent starting point to the design, then to optimize it locally using computer-aided design software. Global optimization methods are useful for finding different forms of design, but somewhat limited since they operate blindly on the problem, that is, they do not learn from experience and cannot recognize good lens design patterns like experienced lens designers would.

Given the current success of many areas in artificial intelligence, namely in machine learning, we believe that some approaches could be adapted to the field of lens design to provide new methods of lens design that could exploit knowledge gained from data. For instance, one approach explored in this project is to enable a deep neural network to learn, in a non-supervised setting, to output lens designs that are optimized with regard to the specifications that are given as input to the network.





Olivier Côté, Master's student


Université Laval, Pavillon d'optique-photonique, office 3134
Telephone: 418-656-2131 ext. 4584
olivier.cote.9@ulaval.ca

HiCIBaS: Design of a pointing and guiding system for a stratospheric balloon borne telescope


This project is part of the High Contrast Imaging Balloon System (HiCIBaS) project. The aim of the HiCIBaS project is to launch at an altitude of 40km a telescope equipped with an adaptive optics system to perform high contrast imaging of stars. My responsibility in this project is to design the system that orients the telescope to a target star. Also, the system must be able to stabilize the telescope to a precision of less than an arc second. There are three main parts to this project. First, the system must be able to find the orientation of the telescope by analyzing only an image of the sky. Second, the system must be able to detect the nacelle’s movement in roll, pitch, and yaw. Finally, the system must communicate direction commands to the telescope’s motors.





Mathieu Gagnon, Master's student


Université Laval, Pavillon d'optique-photonique, office 2173
Telephone: 418-656-2131
mathieu.gagnon.21@ulaval.ca

Wide-angle 3D vision system based on Kinect V2 for outdoor navigation


In collaboration with the Innovative Vehicule Institute (IVI), we are developing off-road autonomous vehicle for application in agriculture. More precisely, our project is to conceive and build a 3D captor for navigation. Features include resistance to dust, vibrations and lighting conditions for outdoor application. Our approach consists in using low-cost system like Kinect V2 from Microsoft and increasing its angle of view up to 180 degrees using panomorphic lenses, while keeping enough resolution for good environment perception.

The first step is to analyse the Kinect V2 on its technical features and its operation. Also, identifying and quantifying the Kinect V2 limitations on lighting and 3D measurement will be necessary. The second step is to conceive an optical attachment increasing the Kinect angle of view. The third step is to implement this attachment with a module directly fixed on the hardware. The final step is to test in real condition our system to obtain a working product for autonomous off-road vehicle.





Jason Guénette, Master's student


Université Laval, Pavillon d'optique-photonique, office 2177
Telephone: 418-656-2131 ext. 16566
jason.guenette.1@ulaval.ca

Conception of a refractive index profile axicon


This research project consists to design and analyse a gradient refraction index axicon. The researched refractive index profile is radial and produces a periodic annular focusing. A similar index profile has already been briefly study by E. Marchand and by Rosa M. Gonzalez. However, the solution that they propose are approximate solutions and the study are limited about ray trace propagation. The interest of studying that kind of axicon is that, it has the advantage that it could be easily miniaturised because it can be made with the same process as optical fiber and also the axicon has no tip (the manufacturing of the tip is one of the major issue of the conical lens). In this project the solution of the exact refractive index profile is find, the propagation of the ray from a ray optic point of view and also from diffraction point of view is analyse. The possibility to produce Bessel beam whit this axicon will also be analysed. Simulation will be performed to valid theories and to determine the most appropriate way to produce a Bessel. Some experimental test is also done to demonstrate that it is relatively easy to produce that kind of axicon and that he is relatively robust.





Farbod Jahandar, PhD student


Université de Montréal, Pavillon Roger-Gaudry, B-406-1 (access via B-416)
Telephone: 514-343-6111
farbod@astro.umontreal.ca

VROOMM: Design of a high-resolution optical spectograph for l’Observatoire du Mont-Mégantic


The project aims at the design and implementation of a high-resolution optical spectrograph to detect exoplanets (VROOMM). The instrument will measure, with a high precision, radial velocity of nearby bright stars, in particular 1400 in the northern hemisphere, all strongly suspected to host one or several transiting exoplanets. The design will be partially inspired by HARPS (High Accuracy Radial velocity Planet Searcher) and its near infrared version, NIRPS. The project include the design, implementation and integration of the instrument, as well as tests and measures scheduled at the Observatoire du Mont-Mégantic in Fall 2018.





Gabriel Lachance, Master's student


Université Laval, Pavillon d'optique-photonique
Telephone: 418-656-2131
gabriel.lachance.4@ulaval.ca

Design and test of underwater fibre-optic irradiance measurement and logging system


The research project consists of creating and installing an underwater light sensor system that will be used in the fresh water lakes of the Canadian arctic using resources from the COPL, the CEN and Sentinel North. We now know that a system using fiber optic sensors would be ideal for this purpose as it is autonomous. This method of using a fiber optic sensor is able to detect light at different depth in water simultaneously. By using a passive fiber optic sensor system, it is possible to create tools that are able to be deployed in the field for long periods of time and be able to take measurements without the need for a technician. To be able to do that, the instrument is required to not have any moving parts and needs to be tested rigorously to assure the well-being of the instrument for long periods of measurement in the extreme conditions of the Canadian’s arctic.

Experiments in laboratory are going to be required to test the different parts of the project and to assemble the system. Then, the detectors coupled to the fibers must be tested to increase their efficiency. It will be required to make and use an optomechanics and electronic assembly to be able to obtain a first prototype that can be submitted to conditions like those that will be experienced on the field.

Finally, the assembly and the deployment of the instrument will be done as a way to test how it works on the field and to gather data concerning the quantity of light present underwater in arctic lakes. By deploying the instrument, it will be possible to gather some preliminary data which will be used by the biology research team involved to this project to draw conclusion concerning the amount of light available underwater and the changes that it can cause to the microbiome of the lakes.





Raphael Larouche, Master's student


Université Laval, Pavillon Alexandre-Vachon, office 2064
Telephone: 418-656-2131
raphael.larouche.1@ulaval.ca

Design, construction, calibration and experimental validation of a miniature detector to measure in-ice radiance distribution


This research project consists in designing and building a miniature instrument to measure angular radiance distributions within sea ice. In Northern Hemisphere, sea ice is thinning and decreasing in extent, which has impacts on climate and biology.

Radiance is a fundamental radiometric quantity related to medium's inherent optical properties by the radiative transfer equation. Inherent optical properties depend solely on physical properties. Improving structural-optical links would allow better understanding of radiative transfers in sea ice which influence energy/mass budgets and primary production. Previous studies sampled in-ice radiance angular distributions, but those measurements were constrained by bulky radiometer destroying the medium, provided limited vertical and angular resolution or inducing shadowing.

Therefore, we aim at integrating miniature fish-eyes to the probe. This type of lens permits collection of radiance from all directions simultaneously. To account for sea ice structural components spectral signatures, an optic filtration system will be included. The first step of the project consists at defining requirements and choosing a design. The second part is to build a prototype, characterize it and calibrate it for angles and absolute radiance. Finally, field deployment will allow sampling of preliminary measurements to confirm the performances of the probe.





Jean-Philippe Leclerc, Master's student


Université Laval, Pavillon d'optique-photonique
Telephone: 418-656-2131
jean-philippe.leclerc.2@ulaval.ca

Title coming soon


More details to come.





Félix Lévesque-Desrosiers, Master's student


Université Laval, Pavillon d'optique-photonique, office 2173
Telephone: 418-656-2131
felix.levesque-desrosiers.1@ulaval.ca

Towards automatization of snow properties measurements


Current measurement of snow properties requires manual manipulations. These manipulations are in fact 3 different measurements that scientists need to carefully acquire two optical measurements combined with a density measurement. The goal of this project is to automatize these measurement by measuring all the optical properties of the snow at once. For snow scientists, this project would give them possibilities to monitor snow all year long in the most foreign territories of the world. The device in development uses the fact that snow is a highly scattering media and the radiative transfer in this media depends on the properties of the ice grains constituting the snow and the snowpack itself. The optical properties of snow are influenced by the density of the snowpack, the size of a snow grain and the shape of the grains. The devise will be sending light in the medium and measure the outcomes of that light. Three different outcomes will need to be measured to monitor these properties. Transmittance measurement and albedo measurement are already used to monitor the snow and will also be used in this project, but the most ambitious part of this project is to measure the propagation time of light in the snow. Light’s propagation time will be affected by the density of the snow due to the speed of light that depends on the fraction of it’s path that is traveled in ice and on the length of the path itself. To characterize the propagation time as a function of the different properties of the snow, a ray tracing model is used instead of usual radiative transfer model. This model can give the path lengths and the fraction of the path in ice because snow can be modeled with rays’ optic. With the ray tracing model, a database of propagation times and retro diffusion profiles will be used to invert the properties of the snow from the optical measurements on the field.





Renaud Lussier, PhD student


Université Laval, Pavillon Alexandre-Vachon, office 4237
Telephone: 418-656-2131
renaud.lussier.1@ulaval.ca

Polymer/magnetic nanoparticle nanocomposite based new deformable mirrors


Deformable mirrors are the master piece of an adaptive optics system. Their size, the materials they are made of, their actuation system and their deformability are driven by the desired application. There is no mirror that is appropriate to every application. Low cost and versatile deformable mirrors could help democratize adaptive optics technologies. Research for new types of deformables mirror is thus relevant. The doctoral project pursue the motivation of developping new deformable mirrors for adaptive optics. The technology of interest is based on polymer/magnetic nanoparticle composites. Polymer, more precisely elastomers, have a high deformability, are generally easy to process and have diverse mechanical properties. Magnetic nanoparticles can be incorporated into elastomers to produce deformations using localized magnetic fields.

The proposed technology stands out from the current deformable mirrors by the low cost of the materials used and by the relative ease of assembly. Also, the deformable surface is totally independent of the actuating system since there is no physical contact between them and the material is uniform. This type of deformable mirroir will thus be very versatile.

During the project, the assembly process is developped and the properties/performances of the device are optimized in order to produce operational magnetically deformable mirrors.





Simon Munger, Master's student


Université Laval, Pavillon d'optique-photonique
Téléphone: 418-656-2131
simon.munger.1@ulaval.ca

Title coming soon.


More details to come.



Mireille Ouellet, Master's student


Université Laval, Pavillon d'optique-photonique, office 2177
Telephone: 418-656-2131 ext. 16566
mireille.ouellet.4@ulaval.ca

HiCIBaS: Integration and characterization of an adaptive optics subsystem combining a deformable mirror and a coronagraph on board of the balloon-borne telescope project HiCIBaS


The microelectroctromechal (MEMS) deformable mirror (DM) technology for adaptive optics has shown a great potential to be key components in future high-contrast imaging missions of exoplanets. Those high-performance DMs had improved to be more compact and less power consuming which is of critical interest for space-based telescope applications. The high contrast needed to do direct imaging of exoplanets requires the use of a DM for wavefront correction combine with a high performance coronagraph. The aim of this project is to verify the technology readiness of those two components by characterizing them in space-like condition on board of the ballon-born telescope project HiCIBaS (High-Contrast Imaging Ballon System).

This project is divided in three main objectives. The first goal is to design and integrate the AO subsystem by doing optical design optimization for space-like condition. The integrated subsystem includes a DM provided by Iris AO, a coronagraph technology from Leiden University and an EMCCD science camera which is used as the science camera and the wavefront sensor.The second goal is to characterize the DM response and performance for several loop operation modes with a close-loop mode that will be achieved with a focal-plane reconstruction algorithms. The third and last goal is to perform coronagraphic measurements with both a calibration source and selected stars during the flight mission.





Deven Patel, Master's student


Université Laval, Pavillon d'optique-photonique, office 3134
Telephone: 418-656-2131 ext. 4584
deven.patel.1@ulaval.ca

HiCIBaS: Optomechanical design and integration of a EMCCD camera


The High-Contrast Imaging Balloon System (HiCIBaS) is a first-generation balloon-borne telescope project that has four objectives: develop and test a custom low-order wavefront sensor (LOWFS), measure and gather data on wavefront instabilities and errors at high altitudes in the visible spectrum, develop and test a sub-milli-arcsecond pointing system, and give high-altitude flight heritage to the LOWFS, deformable mirror and EMCCD cameras. It is being developed by Université Laval, along with numerous collaborators, and will be launched under the Canadian Space Agency’s STRATOS program in August of 2018 from Timmins, Ontario. The “big picture” goal of this project is to characterize the atmosphere and validate the instruments, techniques and concepts used so that they can be employed for future exoplanet-studying missions.

As the mechanical engineer of the group, I am responsible for developing the structure that will be holding some of the front-end optics (telescope and tertiary mirror) and the components of the pointing system needed to guide our telescope towards our target stars. This involves performing various analyses (vibrational, thermal, stress) to ensure that the behavior of the structure will have a minimal impact on the quality of performance of the optics and pointing systems. Some of the key considerations that need to be made to do this are: accurate locating of components, limiting mechanical vibrations, and accounting for thermal deformations. As a lesser part of my mandate, I will also be developing a dissipation system to maintain the controllers and detectors of the EMCCD cameras at optimal operating temperatures.





Charles Pichette, PhD student


Université Laval, Pavillon d'optique-photonique, office 3134
Telephone: 418-656-2131 ext. 4584
charles.pichette.2@ulaval.ca

Diffraction tomography based on holography and ultrashort laser pulses


A better understanding of the nordic ecosystem comes from a good knowledge of the microorganism endemic to this region. These organisms such as protists, procaryotes, and viruses play a strong role in the nutriment and energy cycle of this ecosystem. To study these microorganisms, it is important to develop new optical imaging techniques to investigate their structures and dynamics. However, these organisms have structures of a few tens of nanometers which makes most imaging techniques indequate since they are limited by the diffraction limit (>200nm). This project proposes to develop a new imaging nanoscopy technique to study the structures and dynamics of these microorganisms from the arctic ecosystem. This technique will be based on ultrashort laser pulses with a wide spectral bandwidth to measure the shape and size of these organisms in 3D with a nanometric resolution. These pulses will be used in the context of diffraction tomography where it is possible to obtain the 3D distribution of the refractive index of a nanometric subject. This will allow to combine holography and hyperspectral tomography to improve these techniques.





Madison Rilling, PhD student


Université Laval, Pavillon d'optique-photonique, office 3134
Telephone: 418-656-2131 ext. 4584
madison.rilling.1@ulaval.ca

Development of a 3D scintillation dosimetry system for clinical use in external beam radiotherapy


Modern external beam radiotherapy treatments mostly take advantage of dynamic modalities to deliver optimal dose distributions to patients. To minimize the risk of possible treatment errors, radiation detectors which can measure 3D dose distributions are ideal quality-assurance candidates to assure the precise and safe delivery of the planned treatment. However, available dosimetry tools are limited to 2D measurements, or are inadequate for measuring doses that rapidly vary spatially or temporally. In this context, my research project aims to develop a clinical tool capable of real-time, high-precision and high-resolution measurements of 3D dose distributions delivered in external beam radiotherapy.

My doctoral project builds on the proof of concept of a 3D scintillation dosimetry system that has previously been established. As a target, the system uses a plastic scintillator volume which, when irradiated, emits a fluorescent light proportional to the locally absorbed dose. While the volume is irradiated, a plenoptic camera captures images of the scintillating light field, which records both spatial and directional information of the incident light. We then attempt to reconstruct the measured 3D dose distribution by applying tomographic algorithms to the acquired images, in order to compare the measured dose to the planned dose prior to treatment delivery. To achieve this goal, my research involves designing and optimizing the optics of a system which exploits the joint principles of scintillation dosimetry and plenoptic technology, all the while taking into account the clinical constraints of external beam radiotherapy treatments.





Frédéric Roy, Master's student


Université Laval, Pavillon d'optique-photonique, office 2177
Telephone: 418-656-2131 ext. 16566
frederic.roy.10@ulaval.ca

Conception of a measurement tools for discomfort glare from a LED luminary for night conditions for a pedestrian


The discomfort glare produced by the LED luminary becomes a more important issue with the explosion of their use in urban lighting. The project focus is the discomfort glare fell by pedestrian in an urban night condition against the majority of precedents study who focus on motorists at night or indoor office lighting. First, an angular luminance profile limiting discomfort glare would be found using mathematical models of eye respond. The discomfort glare fell by pedestrians can’t be faithfully described by one measurement at one angle, because the perception of the luminance changes to the position inside the field of view, so we need the luminance for any position inside the field of view. The angular profile should consider the entire discomfort glare feel by the pedestrian all along his walk under the luminary. Second, a new scale for discomfort using the divergence of this “perfect” profile would be postulated. Using this new scale in combination with an image processing algorithm should describe accurately the discomfort glare generated by LED luminaries for pedestrians. This algorithm would use a video and source angle to calculating the discomfort glare. This algorithm would be compatible with a cellphone resource for a possible mobile application version.





Cédric Vallée, Master's student


Université Laval, Pavillon d'optique-photonique, office 2177
Telephone: 418-656-2131 ext. 16566
cedric.vallee.1@ulaval.ca

HiCIBaS: Measure and analysis of the residual atmosphérical turbulences in high altitude with the data of a low order wavefront sensor


Within the project HiCIBaS (High-Contrast Imaging Balloon System), a 14 inch telescope equipped with a wavefront sensor and a deformable mirror is lifted up to 35Km to test the usage of a MEMS (Microelectromechanical systems) deformable mirror, EMCCD Nüvü cameras and other instruments in space-like conditions. Apart from this, the project has the scientific goal to use the data from the embarked LOWFS (Low Order Wavefront Sensor) and extract a measurement of the atmospheric turbulences in high altitude. The work packages of this master are to design and develop the software that will ensure communication with ground and control the subsystems, define the performance requirements and design a on-board computer and develop the data reduction and data analysis softwares. The communication interface will use the network provided by the canadian space agency to communicate with the ground. The control software will be autonomous and will use a database management software to ensure the data produced will have the chronological coherence needed to detect any bugs or glitches in data that would come from the system itself. The turbulences measure will be obtained by decomposing the wavefront aberrations with Kolmogorov phenomenological statistics.





Maxime Vernier, Master's student


Université Laval, Pavillon d'optique-photonique
Telephone: 418-656-2131


Title coming soon

More details to come.





Zhenfeng Zhuang, Postdoctoral fellow


Université Laval, Pavillon d'optique-photonique, office 3149
Telephone: 418-656-2131
zhenfeng.zhuang.1@ulaval.ca

Expertise: Optical design, CAD, display technology, numerical optimization algorithm

Zhenfeng Zhuang received his PhD from the College of Optical Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, China, in 2014. He joined in Advanced Display Lab in Nanyang Technological University, Singapore as a research fellow, where he developed glasses-free autostereoscopic display. He is currently a postdoctoral fellow in physics at the Centre of Optics, Photonics, and Lasers, Université Laval, Canada. His research interests include nonimaging optical design, optical instrumentation, head mounted displays and 3D displays.